Skip to main content
Home | WBU BirdTracks Blog  

WBU BirdTracks Blog

Filtering posts by: Birds
February 27, 2014
Crazy Weather, Crazy Bird Activity
By Brian Cunningham, Manager of Nature & Hobby Education | Birds
“Last week was bitter cold and there was crazy bird activity at the feeders. This week is warm and sunny and there are no birds in sight. What’s going on?” Birds need calories to stay warm. They get their calories from food for which they are constantly foraging. The feeders in our yards are a
Tufted-Titmouse, Bird Photo, Wild Birds Unlimited, WBU
January 22, 2014
Where do Birds Find Water in Winter?
By Margaret Collins, Media & PR Manager | Birds
It can be difficult for birds find water in winter if water sources are frozen. They may have to travel a long way to an open source or resort to eating snow (if there is any). Birds need drinking water to maintain a healthy metabolism to stay warm and hydrated. They need it for bathing
Juncos, Bird Photo, Wild Birds Unlimited, WBU
January 16, 2014
Who’s in Charge?
By Margaret Collins, Media & PR Manager | Birds
Have you ever seen juncos fan their tails at one another? What about lunging at each other? Juncos definitely have a dominance hierarchy (kind of like a pecking order) in their winter flocks. You can often observe individuals challenging the status of others with aggressive displays of tail fanning and lunges. So, who’s in charge?
December 13, 2013
Decorate a Wreath for the Birds
By Paul E. Pickett, Chief Development Officer | Birds
I started making bird wreaths back in the 90s for myself and for friends and family who loved birds and bird feeding and who were hard to buy for during the holidays. I have continued to make them for over 20 years and love this tradition each and every year. Since the invention of Bark
Dark eyed Junco, Bird Photo, Wild Birds Unlimited, WBU
December 5, 2013
The Morse Code Bird
By Brian Cunningham, Manager of Nature & Hobby Education | Birds
Every winter the Dark-eyed Junco departs from its northerly breeding grounds of summer and descends upon the lower 48 states. Some western and northeastern states have them year-round where they can be heard singing their pretty trilling song. For those who only have juncos in winter, we only get to listen to their call and